Don’t Limit His Forgiveness

Okay, yesterday we talk about how guilt was going to destroy your walk of faith and you’ve blown it. Once again you have to repent of the same thing. How many times has it been? Over and over, the same thing. “Oh Father, forgive me . . .”

Well my friend, you can never limit God’s forgiveness to you! There is no limit to his forgiveness and longsuffering. Jesus told his disciples, “Even if that person wrongs you seven times a day and each time turns again and asks forgiveness, you must forgive” (Luke 17:4).

Can you believe something like that? Seven times a day this person willfully, and sometimes with joy, betrays you right in front of your very eyes, then says “I’m sorry, please forgive me.” Oh, I see that shocked look on your face. You’re asking, “We are supposed to forgive them—continuously—without exception?” Yep. That’s what he is saying. If he expects that of us, how much more will our heavenly Father forgive his children who come in repentance to him? Don’t stop to figure it out—and don’t ask how or why he forgives so freely. Simply accept it!

Jesus didn’t say, “Forgive your brother once or twice, then tell him to go and sin no more. Tell him that if he ever does it again he will be cut off. Tell him he is an habitual sinner and seven times is his limit.” No! We would prefer that, but Jesus called for unlimited, no-strings-attached forgiveness!

It’s God’s nature to forgive. David said, “O Lord, you are so good, so ready to forgive, so full of unfailing love for all who ask for your help” (Psalm 86:5). God is waiting right now to flood your being with the joy of forgiveness. You need to open up all the doors and windows of your soul and allow his Spirit to flood you with forgiveness.

John, speaking as a Christian, wrote, “He is the atoning sacrifice for our sins, and not only for ours but also for the sins of the whole world” (1 John 2:2).

According to John, the goal of every Christian is to “sin not.” That means the Christian is not bent toward sin but, instead, leans toward God. But what happens when that God-leaning child sins?

“If anyone does sin, we have an advocate who pleads our case before the Father. He is Jesus Christ, the one who is truly righteous” (1 John 2:1).

“But if we confess our sins to him, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all wickedness” (1 John 1:9).

I love the way the Amplified Version renders that verse: “If we freely admit that we have sinned and confess our sins, He is faithful and just (true to His own nature and promises) and will forgive our sins [dismiss our lawlessness] and continuously cleanse us from all unrighteousness [everything not in conformity to His will in purpose, thought, and action].” What mouthful of delight and comfort!

Lay down your guilt, my friend. You don’t need to carry that load another minute. Open up the doors and windows of your heart, and let God’s love in. He forgives you—over and over again! He will give you the power to see your struggle through to victory. If you ask—if you repent—you are forgiven! Accept it—now!

Oh Father, I rejoice and I am overwhelmed at your mercy! I certainly wouldn’t blame you for renouncing me and for giving up on me. I see how poorly I measure up to your Glory and Righteousness. But Father, once again this morning I receive your forgiveness. I don’t know how you are able to do it, but I receive it and I thank you. Be Glorified in me today. You are my delight and joy and I the rest of this day, I will continue to walk in your presence and in your forgiveness.

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