Shavu’ot (or Pentecost)

Earlier, during the Christian celebration of Passover, the Crucifixion of Jesus and His Resurrection–and Jews celebrated Pesach–or Passover, Matza–or Feast of Unleavened Bread and Bikkurim, or Firstfruits (which occurs the day immediately after the first day of Matza). So the first 3 festivals (of 7) occur in turn the 14th, 15th, and 16th of Aviv.

Then, 50 days later, is the celebration of Shavu’ot, the Feast of Weeks (non-Jews know it as “Pentecost“). This year, the festival began yesterday, June 3, 2014. Open your Bibles and let‘s read a bit of Deuteronomy 16.

Count seven weeks from the time you start harvesting grain. Then celebrate the Festival of Weeks to Yahweh your Elohim. Bring a freewill offering in proportion to the blessings Yahweh your Elohim has given you. Enjoy yourselves in the presence of Yahweh your Elohim along with your sons, daughters, male and female slaves, the Levites who live in your cities, the foreigners, orphans, and widows who live among you. Enjoy yourselves at the place Yahweh your Elohim will choose for his name to live. Remember that you were slaves in Egypt, and obey these laws carefully —Deuteronomomy 16:9-12

Christians know Shavu’ot better as Pentecost; Pentecost is simply the Greek word for Shavu’ot. As you probably know, Pentecost was the day that the Holy Spirit came to live within those who trusted Yeshua as Savior. It was the day that all those Jews started speaking in tongues. I have said this many times but as a teacher I guess I get a pass for repeating myself: Pentecost was not a day that was created by Christians to commemorate the coming of the Holy Spirit. Pentecost was already a 1300 year old Holy Day by Jesus‘ time.

What happened is that Pentecost (Shavu’ot) was a prophetic foreshadow of the coming of the Holy Spirit. And naturally, as all prophecy is 100% accurate and flawless, that is exactly what happened—the Holy Spirit came on the summertime Feast Day of Shavu’ot.

While the arrival of the Holy Spirit is the Christian reason for the day, the Jewish people see it as something else. In fact for the Jew it comes from an agricultural standpoint, the nearly two-month period from the time of Firstfruits until the time of Shavu’ot covers the grain harvesting period of both the Barley and the Wheat harvests.

What this means is that while Firstfruits signals that the harvesting of the Barley will begin within a few hours or days, Shavu’ot signals the end of harvesting the wheat. What I mean is that the Barley harvest begins around the time of Firstfruits and then ends around a month later. At the proper moment during the second-half of that 7-week period the wheat harvesting begins, and then at Shavu’ot (the end of the 7 week period) the wheat harvesting ends.

The second meaning of Shavu’ot for Hebrews is that it is celebrating the time Moses received the Law on Mount Sinai. The Scriptures show us that it was around 50-days after Israel fled Egypt that Moses received the Law from God–so there is an amazing connection between Moses receiving the Law of God written on stone tablets and the coming of the Holy Spirit. Remember how Jeremiah prophesied that a day would come when God would write His Laws on the hearts of those who love Him? The New Testament confirms that it was on the day that the Holy Spirit came—Pentecost, Shavu’ot! God wrote His Laws on our hearts on Shavo’ut–Pentecost.

God‘s first set-apart people received the Law on Shavu’ot, through Moses, just as God‘s second set-apart people received the Law on Shavu’ot, through Yeshua.

Interestingly, when YHWH gave Moses those law at Sinai, the people were to write the Law on their own hearts. They were to do this by thinking—pondering–meditating on those laws night and day. However, in Jeremiah’s prophesy, the Lord said that when He renewed the giving of the Law this time, He was going to write those Laws on the hearts of His people.

In both cases the Law was to be written on the human heart, but in the first case the individual was to do it himself, and in the second God would do it supernaturally. That is cool!

Something else that is cool about Shavu’ot (Pentecost), is that it is uniquely inclusive! Israel is told to include males, females, slave, free, Levites, orphans, widows, even strangers (ger) (Ger are non-Hebrews (gentiles) that have decided to bond themselves to Israel but they‘re not circumcised). What I am getting at is that those who can be included in the meaning of Shavu’ot do not have to become official Hebrews through the b’rit milah, the circumcision ceremony.

What this means is that anyone who wishes to call Yeshua their Lord can be Hebrews or non-Hebrews, but they must bond themselves to Israel (as Paul says, “be grafted in”); yet that bonding does not mean that a ger needs a circumcision ceremony to make them (us), official Hebrews. We can remain gentiles and yet still be part of Israel just as the scenario is in the Torah. Why are you still sitting down in your chair? You should be running around and shouting with excitement!

Earlier, during the Christian celebration of Passover, the Crucifixion of Jesus and His Resurrection–and Jews celebrated Pesach–or Passover, Matza–or Feast of Unleavened Bread and Bikkurim, or Firstfruits (which occurs the day immediately after the first day of Matza). So the first 3 festivals (of 7) occur in turn the 14th, 15th, and 16th of Aviv.

Then, 50 days later, is the celebration of Shavu’ot, the Feast of Weeks (non-Jews know it as “Pentecost“). This year, the festival began yesterday, June 3, 2014. Open your Bibles and let‘s read a bit of Deuteronomy 16.

Count seven weeks from the time you start harvesting grain. Then celebrate the Festival of Weeks to Yahweh your Elohim. Bring a freewill offering in proportion to the blessings Yahweh your Elohim has given you. Enjoy yourselves in the presence of Yahweh your Elohim along with your sons, daughters, male and female slaves, the Levites who live in your cities, the foreigners, orphans, and widows who live among you. Enjoy yourselves at the place Yahweh your Elohim will choose for his name to live. Remember that you were slaves in Egypt, and obey these laws carefully —Deuteronomomy 16:9-12

Christians know Shavu’ot better as Pentecost; Pentecost is simply the Greek word for Shavu’ot. As you probably know, Pentecost was the day that the Holy Spirit came to live within those who trusted Yeshua as Savior. It was the day that all those Jews started speaking in tongues. I have said this many times but as a teacher I guess I get a pass for repeating myself: Pentecost was not a day that was created by Christians to commemorate the coming of the Holy Spirit. Pentecost was already a 1300 year old Holy Day by Jesus‘ time.

What happened is that Pentecost (Shavu’ot) was a prophetic foreshadow of the coming of the Holy Spirit. And naturally, as all prophecy is 100% accurate and flawless, that is exactly what happened—the Holy Spirit came on the summertime Feast Day of Shavu’ot.

While the arrival of the Holy Spirit is the Christian reason for the day, the Jewish people see it as something else. In fact for the Jew it comes from an agricultural standpoint, the nearly two-month period from the time of Firstfruits until the time of Shavu’ot covers the grain harvesting period of both the Barley and the Wheat harvests.

What this means is that while Firstfruits signals that the harvesting of the Barley will begin within a few hours or days, Shavu’ot signals the end of harvesting the wheat. What I mean is that the Barley harvest begins around the time of Firstfruits and then ends around a month later. At the proper moment during the second-half of that 7-week period the wheat harvesting begins, and then at Shavu’ot (the end of the 7 week period) the wheat harvesting ends.

The second meaning of Shavu’ot for Hebrews is that it is celebrating the time Moses received the Law on Mount Sinai. The Scriptures show us that it was around 50-days after Israel fled Egypt that Moses received the Law from God–so there is an amazing connection between Moses receiving the Law of God written on stone tablets and the coming of the Holy Spirit. Remember how Jeremiah prophesied that a day would come when God would write His Laws on the hearts of those who love Him? The New Testament confirms that it was on the day that the Holy Spirit came—Pentecost, Shavu’ot! God wrote His Laws on our hearts on Shavo’ut–Pentecost.

God‘s first set-apart people received the Law on Shavu’ot, through Moses, just as God‘s second set-apart people received the Law on Shavu’ot, through Yeshua.

Interestingly, when YHWH gave Moses those law at Sinai, the people were to write the Law on their own hearts. They were to do this by thinking—pondering–meditating on those laws night and day. However, in Jeremiah’s prophesy, the Lord said that when He renewed the giving of the Law this time, He was going to write those Laws on the hearts of His people.

In both cases the Law was to be written on the human heart, but in the first case the individual was to do it himself, and in the second God would do it supernaturally. That is cool!

Something else that is cool about Shavu’ot (Pentecost), is that it is uniquely inclusive! Israel is told to include males, females, slave, free, Levites, orphans, widows, even strangers (ger) (Ger are non-Hebrews (gentiles) that have decided to bond themselves to Israel but they‘re not circumcised). What I am getting at is that those who can be included in the meaning of Shavu’ot do not have to become official Hebrews through the b’rit milah, the circumcision ceremony.

What this means is that anyone who wishes to call Yeshua their Lord can be Hebrews or non-Hebrews, but they must bond themselves to Israel (as Paul says, “be grafted in”); yet that bonding does not mean that a ger needs a circumcision ceremony to make them (us), official Hebrews. We can remain gentiles and yet still be part of Israel just as the scenario is in the Torah. Why are you still sitting down in your chair? You should be running around and shouting with excitement!

Nickolas

Nickolas

(I send out messages like this each morning in emails, and if you are interested in receiving them, send me your email address and I will add you to the list)

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