THE FINAL WEEK: The Last Days Before Jesus’ Crucifixion (The Days Ahead)

Hang with me, because we have not reached the end of the story! Tomorrow we will celebrate the resurrection of our Lord and King. But as amazing as that is, for forty days after his resurrection, Jesus showed the apostles all kinds of convincing evidence that he was alive. Imagine that! For forty days he appeared to them and talked with them about the kingdom of God, until the day he was taken to heaven.

Then, then . . . fifty days later, on the Feast of Shavuot, the Lord sent His Holy Spirit to dwell within men. That’s right, He is no longer directing you externally, but within you! The Lord harvested His Believers! They were His and put away for safekeeping where no one and nothing could ever forcefully take them, us, away from Him. But, there’s more harvesting to come!

The significance of everything we have seen this past week, where we examined three of  the seven Feasts, were indeed real and honored celebrations, but, as you saw, they also represented  specific events in the Yahweh’s plan to redeem His people.

He wrote this story in the stars, in the wilderness tabernacle, the temple and every aspect of the temple, including the furnishing, represented specific aspects of His plan. Then, He continued to illustrate this in the Feasts He instructed them to follow.

After Shavuot, we have the High Holy Days of the Feast of Trumpets and Yom Kippur.  The Feast of Tabernacles, or more appropriately as it is also known, the Feast of Ingathering, is the entry into the 1000-Year Reign of Christ — the Millennium. I am not going into all the details right now, but I will point out the amazing parallels between the focal point and grand finale of the Feast of Sukkot: the Water Libation ceremony at the Altar of Burnt Offering.

The earthly purpose for this event was to ask God to bring rain to the land to water the crops. In the final moments of the final Biblical Feast of each year, the closing event is that seven trumpets are blown three times for a total of twenty-one blasts of the trumpet, as a Golden Pitcher of water from the spring of Siloam is brought by the High Priest through the Water Gate of the Temple Mount.

Then the water is poured out from that Golden Pitcher while the people of Jerusalem say in unison, “God save us now!” These twenty-one trumpet blasts represent the three series of seven final judgments that will be rained down on the world in man’s final hours. After these twenty-one judgments, it is finished. The history of man as we know it . . . is over. Yeshua HaMashiach is now in total control of a world without even one single rebel; not one single person is alive who doesn’t know the Lord and bow down to Him. And that is the way it will remain for 1000 years!

So here we are, thousands of years later, awaiting that final day of Redemption, and we need to resolve now: how do you choose to react?

Give thanks to Yahweh because he is good,
    because his mercy endures forever.
         Israel should say,
            “His mercy endures forever.”
         The descendants of Aaron should say,
            “His mercy endures forever.”
         Those who fear Yahweh should say,
            “His mercy endures forever (Psalm 118:1-14)

Nickolas
Doulos Studies

(I send out messages like this each morning in emails, and if you are interested in receiving them, send me your email address and I will add you—a to the list: Mail List)

I do thank you for your gifts. It is your faithful and continued support that makes these messages possible.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Daily Thoughts, Final Week. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s